Stitch Index

When I first started this Index it was called ‘Stitch Abbreviations and Glossary’. I’ve decided to shorten it to ‘Stitch Index’ for several reasons.
Firstly, I want it to be as extensive as I can make it, which means that I’m going to include US and UK stitch names.
I use US stitch names for my tutorials so I was going to leave the UK names out but I know it can be frustrating if you’re reading through a tutorial and halfway through you realise that you’re using the wrong stitches and then you need to go and find the names of the stitches in US or UK. So I thought I’d add them all here, in one place. UK names as well as any other variations and differences are bracketed.
Secondly, I’ve decided that it’s not really a good index unless it has the symbols for each of the stitches too, so I will be adding those too.A note on the Index:
I give the abbreviation first, because that’s usually what you are faced with in a pattern. Those of us who read crochet just whizz through a pattern without a problem but to the crochet newbies something like this CH 3 (counts as DC), 2 DC btw DC of next 2 DC groups, CH 2 etc’ probably looks like a chemical formula or something like that!
The index is not alphabetical it’s in the order that you would usually perform the task in; so I start with the chain, then stitch, yarn over and then from smallest stitch moving up and then followed by more complicated stitches, such as the Front Post and cluster stitches.
I will be adding to this list as I go along and if you feel I am leaving something out please let me know.
I will not add stitch patterns here, only individual stitches.
Fundamentals
  • YOyarn over (also YOH – yarn over hook): the action of winding the yarn over the crochet hook to create a loop
  • CH – Chain: make a slip knot, place on hook, YO and pull through loop
  • MR Magic Ring (also Magic Loop or Adjustable Ring): Make a large loop with the end of the yarn lying on top of the working yarn. Hold the loop with your thumb and forefinger, insert the hook and pull the working yarn through. Chain 1 to lock the loop. Pretend that the looped yarn is a row of stitches and work the required number of stitches into the loop. Once you have completed the stitches pull the end of the yarn to tighten the loop and close the hole. The magic ring is useful for amigurumi or in any piece worked in the round where you don’t want to have a hole in the center.
  • ST – Stitch: usually referring to the stitch in the previous row/round.
  • T-CH – Turning Chain: this is used at the end of a row when working on a flat piece of crochet. Depending on the ST you will have one or more turning chains.
    Remember that you will need to add a turning chain at the end of your foundation chain too, or you will have one less ST than you actually should have.

Basic Stitches

  • SLSTSlip Stitch: insert hook into ST , YO pull through ST (1 loop on hook) and loop on hook
  • SCSingle Crochet (UK: DC Double Crochet): insert hook into ST , YO pull through ST (2 loops on hook), YO pull through 2 loops on hook
  • HDC –  Half Double Crochet (UK: HTC Half Treble Crochet): YO, insert hook into ST, YO pull through ST (3 loops on hook), YO pull through 3 loops on hook
  • DCDouble Crochet (UK: TC Treble Crochet): YO, insert hook into ST, YO pull through ST (3 loops on hook), YO pull through 2 loops on hook, YO pull through 2 loops on hook
  • HTC Half Treble Crochet: YO twice, insert hook into ST, Yo pull through ST (4 loops on hook), YO pull through 2 loops on hook, YO pull through 3 loops on hook. (Note this is not the UK half treble, it is an ‘in between’ ST that falls between the US DC and TC ST. I do not know a UK name for it, I guess it could be called a HDT or Half Double Treble. I use this stitch in my Overlay Heart and thought that it was my own idea but I saw it mentioned on a different website a while after I started compiling this index.)
  • TC Treble Crochet (UK: DT Double Treble) : YO twice, insert hook into ST, YO pull through ST (4 loops on hook), YO pull through 2 loops on hook, YO pull through 2 loops on hook, YO pull through 2 loops on hook.

Advanced Stitches

  • FP – Front Post (UK: Raised Front) : work around the post of the stitch by inserting the hook between posts; from the front to the back and to the front again. FP stitches can range from HDC to TC and even longer, depending on where the stitch is to be placed. Directions will usually tell you which row or round to insert the hook into when using a FP.
  • BP -Back Post (UK: Raised Back):work around the post of the stitch by inserting the hook between posts; from the back to the front and to the back again.
  • SP – Spike Stitch: This ST is mostly used with SCs. Insert hook into ST one (or more) row/s or round/s lower  , YO pull through ST (2 loops on hook), YO pull through 2 loops on hook. Alternating SCs and SCspike STs creates a really firm fabric great for bags and coats or thick blankets. It is also quite decorative when two ore more colours are used as the spike forms a little ‘v’ shape.
  • ESTExtended Stitch: This can be done with any ST and creates a softer fabric. For an extended SC ST (ESC) insert hook into ST, YO, pull through ST, YO, pull through one loop on hook, YO, pull through two loops on hook. The EST basically adds a CH under the ST of choice, which lengthens and loosens the fabric.

Cluster Stitches

  • ST#TOG – Stitch # Together: Note: the ST refers to the type of ST to be used, i.e. SC, DC etc. and the # refers to the number of individual STs that make up the stitch. This is a type cluster stitch which creates a type of shell or fan. Insert hook into next ST, YO and finish off ST, leaving one loop of the ST on the hook. After the first ST you have two loops left on the hook. Work the second ST into the next  ST and again finish off ST leaving one loop on the hook (three loops). Repeat for the required number of ST, YO and draw loop through the remaining number of loops on hook.
  • SH – Shell Stitch:This ST is usually made up with HDC or larger STs. It is made by placing three or more STs into the same ST. It is not an increase because the number of ST remain the same in each row or round.
  • PUFF – Puff Stitch: This ST can only be made with the HDC. YO, insert hook into ST, YO and pull up loop, YO, insert hook into same ST, YO and pull up loop, repeat required number of times. To finish off, YO and draw through all loops on hook. Can be secured with SS for a neater finish. TIP: pull the loops up a bit so that they are all the same length. The effect is a stitch with loops of yarn that ‘puff’ out of the fabric. It is quite delicate as the individual loops can be pulled so I would not use it for baby blankets and such projects. But as embellishments on beanies or little puff stitch flowers are wonderful.
  • BOB – Bobble Stitch: Many crocheters call this ST a PUFF too but I think there is a difference, since the PUFF (as mentioned above) is unique to the HDC. The BOB can be created with any ST from DC upwards. The principle is the same as with the PuffST. For a DC BobbleST: YO, insert hook into ST, YO, pull up loop and draw through two loops on hook, repeat desired number of times (usually three or more), finish off ST with YO and draw through all loops on hook.
  • POP – Popcorn Stitch: To create the POP proceed as with the SH. Once all STs are completed remove the hook from the loop. Insert the hook into the first ST of the shell and through the loop and draw the loop through the first ST of the SH. You will notice that the top of the ST puckers outwards and creates a shape similar to a piece popcorn.

Other important terms

  • blp – back loop only: insert the hook only through the back loop of the ST.
  • flp – front loop only: insert the hook only through the front loop of the ST.
  • ch-sp – chain space: In a pattern that makes use of STs alternating with CHs the spaces made by the CHs are referred to as chain spaces.
  • lp(s) – loop(s): refers to the loops of yarn on the hook.
  • RS – right side: refers to the right side of the pattern, i.e. the side that should be facing out (in an item of clothing) or up (in a blanket). Especially important when using STs such as FP and BP, or any of the cluster STs.
  • WS – wrong side: refers to the wrong side of the pattern, i.e. the side that should be facing in (in an item of clothing) or down (in a blanket).
  • sk – skip (UK: miss): skipping a stitch, used to create a lacy pattern or, occasionally when decreasing.
  • rep – repeat: to repeat a set of instructions, usually receded by * to indicate where the repeat begins.
  • brackets () [] brackets are often used to indicate a set of stitches, or the corners in Granny Squares. The instructions in the brackets are usually worked into the same ST or ch-sp.

Comments (33)

  1. Pingback: Overlay Crochet Heart | A bag full of Crochet

  2. muito obtigado por me ajudar a aprender o crochet overlay

  3. Pingback: Overlay Crochet Heart | a bag full of crochet

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  30. Hi Stephanie,

    My name is Malcolm. 66 male, living in Namibia.
    I have for years admired crocheters; believing the dexterity required far beyond me. Then I found a book in the local library. Opened it and saw how it was done and am now hooked.
    Please could you tell me where in South Africa can one buy yarns and threads? Where I can learn which threads are which.
    I loved the springbok.

    • Hi Malcolm,
      welcome to the world of crochet!!
      I have to recommend Yarn in a Barn. It was my favourite place to buy yarn from and the owner, Hilda is lovely.
      She has an online store too and does ship to Nam 😉
      She is also very helpful with information about yarns, so pop her an email.

    • Woot, I will cetilrnay put this to good use!

  31. Thank you.

    Will give it a try.

    all the best.

    Malcolm

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